Conservation and Society

ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 297--309

Conserving Poverty: Destructive Fishing Gear Use in a Tanzanian Marine Protected Area


Justin Raycraft 
 Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Justin Raycraft
Department of Anthropology, McGill University, Montreal, QC
Canada

Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork, this paper attends to the persistent use of Destructive Fishing Gear (DFG) in a Marine Protected Area (MPA) in southeastern Tanzania. Based on participant observation, document analysis, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions conducted with villagers, I argue that the MPA has failed to eliminate the use of DFG because of its inability to address the historically-embedded political, economic, and sociocultural dimensions of DFG use in the inshore fishery. I contend that pre-existing and conservation-induced conditions of poverty drive the continued use of DFG inside the MPA. Such circumstances are framed by colonial and post-independence state-level development policies. They are also textured by breakdowns in customary marine tenure practices, changing beliefs about which types of fishing gear villagers consider to be traditional, and community-defined moral rights to fish for the fulfilment of basic material needs. I maintain that MPAs must take into account the anthropological complexities of poverty if they are to be effective.


How to cite this article:
Raycraft J. Conserving Poverty: Destructive Fishing Gear Use in a Tanzanian Marine Protected Area.Conservat Soc 2019;17:297-309


How to cite this URL:
Raycraft J. Conserving Poverty: Destructive Fishing Gear Use in a Tanzanian Marine Protected Area. Conservat Soc [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 7 ];17:297-309
Available from: http://www.conservationandsociety.org/article.asp?issn=0972-4923;year=2019;volume=17;issue=3;spage=297;epage=309;aulast=Raycraft;type=0