Conservation and Society

ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15--25

Laws, Parks, Reserves, and Local Peoples: A Brief Historical Analysis of Conservation Legislation in Mozambique


Anselmo Matusse 
 School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

Correspondence Address:
Anselmo Matusse
School of African and Gender Studies, Anthropology and Linguistics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town
South Africa

This article uses a short historical study of Mozambican conservation legislation to show how local knowledges have been systematically disenfranchised from legislation since colonial period through a discourse analysis of conservation legal documents including constitutions. This study shows that the country has favoured modernity as a framework to deal with nature conservation which clashed in complex ways with local modes of living. Hence the article uses James Scott's concept of 'high-modern ideology' to trace continuities and changes in local knowledges and people marginalisation because of conservation legislation since the colonial period to the present. The article shows that, more market-based approaches to nature conservation are currently being promoted by the state and international donors and organisations; this in turn could lead to local communities treating nature as a commodity.


How to cite this article:
Matusse A. Laws, Parks, Reserves, and Local Peoples: A Brief Historical Analysis of Conservation Legislation in Mozambique.Conservat Soc 2019;17:15-25


How to cite this URL:
Matusse A. Laws, Parks, Reserves, and Local Peoples: A Brief Historical Analysis of Conservation Legislation in Mozambique. Conservat Soc [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 10 ];17:15-25
Available from: http://www.conservationandsociety.org/article.asp?issn=0972-4923;year=2019;volume=17;issue=1;spage=15;epage=25;aulast=Matusse;type=0