Conservation and Society

SPECIAL ISSUES
Year
: 2007  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 478--503

Between Bolivar and Bureaucracy: The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor


Liza Grandia 
 Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University, 950 Main St., Worcester, MA 01610, USA

Correspondence Address:
Liza Grandia
Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University, 950 Main St., Worcester, MA 01610
USA

This article explores how the different elements of the Meso­american Biological Corridor (MBC) may not be so «DQ»naturally united«DQ» as implied by this slogan. I trace the history and evolution of this conservation corridor from its roots in the Central American environment movement to its transformation by the World Bank into a vague bureaucratic framework. The shift to embrace green neoliberalism, in turn, has served to mask threats to biodiversity from three other more powerful economic corridors being simul­taneously constructed in the Mesoamerican region, namely: (1) the Puebla to Panama Plan, (2) Mundo Maya, and (3) the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). I conclude by describing some lost opportunities for in­digenous and bottom-up environmental initiatives to suggest what a Boli­varian alternative might have been before the MBC became bureaucratised by transnational conservation interests.


How to cite this article:
Grandia L. Between Bolivar and Bureaucracy: The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.Conservat Soc 2007;5:478-503


How to cite this URL:
Grandia L. Between Bolivar and Bureaucracy: The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. Conservat Soc [serial online] 2007 [cited 2020 Aug 6 ];5:478-503
Available from: http://www.conservationandsociety.org/article.asp?issn=0972-4923;year=2007;volume=5;issue=4;spage=478;epage=503;aulast=Grandia;type=0