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Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
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ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 179-188

Mapping Scenario Narratives: A Technique to Enhance Landscape-scale Biodiversity Planning


1 Natural and Cultural Heritage Division, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania, Australia
2 Geography and Spatial Sciences, School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania; Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Australia
3 Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University; CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia
4 Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Australia
5 Geography and Spatial Sciences, School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Australia
6 Natural and Cultural Heritage Division, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment; School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania, Australia
7 Centre for Environment, University of Tasmania, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Michael Mitchell
Geography and Spatial Sciences, School of Land and Food, University of Tasmania; Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University
Australia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cs.cs_15_121

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Developing regional scenarios enables planners to engage land managers in discussions about the future, especially in contexts that are complex, uncertain and difficult to control. Richly-crafted qualitative narratives are an effective way to document future scenarios that integrate social, economic and biophysical attributes. Converting such narratives into spatial representations of future landscapes often relies on computational modelling. This paper presents an alternative technique. Key themes from scenario narratives are translated into spatial representations using simple rule sets within a Geographic Information System (GIS). The technique was applied to a case study exploring future scenarios for biodiversity in a predominantly privately-owned agricultural landscape. Iterative analysis of scenarios and their spatial implications enables land managers to explore outcomes from potential interventions and identify strategies that might mitigate the impact of future issues of environmental concern.


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