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Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
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ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 97-111

Who Gains and Who Loses from Compensated Displacement from Protected Areas? The Case of the Derema Corridor, Tanzania


1 Current affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Research undertaken at: World Agroforestry Centre, Nairobi, Kenya
2 World Agroforestry Centre, Nairobi, Kenya
3 Current affiliation: Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Research undertaken at: World Agroforestry Centre, Nairobi, Kenya
4 Department of Geography, University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Correspondence Address:
Salla E Rantala
Current affiliation: Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Research undertaken at: World Agroforestry Centre, Nairobi, Kenya

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-4923.115721

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Increasing attention is being paid to the social impacts of the exclusionary nature of conservation, as well as the mechanisms and policies put in place to mitigate negative impacts. Yet, factors that condition the restoration of well-being among people whose access to resources has changed due to conservation are still poorly understood. In this article we present an analytical framework for studying the social impacts of conservation interventions, and factors affecting post-intervention livelihood rehabilitation. We use this framework to analyse the consequences of the displacement of farmers from the Derema Corridor in northeastern Tanzania, who were given monetary compensation to mitigate livelihood losses. Drawing from qualitative and quantitative data collected over two years following their displacement, we find that the conservation intervention contributed to local social differentiation. Women and the poorest farmers experienced the strongest negative impacts, whereas those who were previously better-off emerged as relative winners among those affected. For more fair and equitable social outcomes, we recommend that conservation planners give careful attention to identifying rights-holders entitled to compensation, promptly implement ex ante risk management mechanisms, and give careful attention to the most appropriate forms of compensation and support measures in the local political economy context.


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