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Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
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ARTICLE
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 154-165

Effects of Land Privatisation on the Use of Common-pool Resources of Varying Mobility in the Argentine Chaco


1 Current affiliation: Environmental Studies, University of Redlands, 1200 East Colton Avenue, P.O. Box 3080, Redlands, CA 92373-0999 and Research undertaken at: School of Natural Resources, University of Arizona, 104 BioScience East, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2 Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, Indiana University, 513 N Park, Bloomington, IN 47408-3895 and Duke Marine Laboratory, Duke University, 135 Duke Marine Lab Road, Beaufort, NC 28516-9721, USA

Correspondence Address:
Mariana Altrichter
Current affiliation: Environmental Studies, University of Redlands, 1200 East Colton Avenue, P.O. Box 3080, Redlands, CA 92373-0999 and Research undertaken at: School of Natural Resources, University of Arizona, 104 BioScience East, Tucson, AZ 85721
USA
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DOI: 10.4103/0972-4923.49209

During the last few decades there has been a strong tendency towards privatisation of land tenure to in­crease protection and sustainable use of natural resources. We assess this approach in the context of land privatisation in a dry region of the Argentine Chaco where low income peasants depend on multiple common-pool resources (CPRs) to survive and where most recently privatisation of land tenure has also included large absentee landowners. We hypothesise that the results of such policies depend in part on the mobility of the resources in question, and compare the harvesting practices of CPRs of varied mobil­ity before and after the conversion of land to private property to assess the effects of privatisation. We found that privatisation by low income peasants increased control of access to stationary and low mobil­ity CPRs but highly mobile species continued being used as open access and over-exploited. In contrast, the later privatisation of land by large absentee landowners is likely to pose serious threats to the conser­vation of the ecosystem in general, and to the ability of low income peasants to maintain their livelihoods in this region.


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