Home       About us   Issues     Search     Submission Subscribe   Contact    Login 
Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
Users Online: 729 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

SPECIAL ISSUES
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-11

Introduction: Institutional Choice and Recognition in the Formation and Consolidation of Local Democracy


1 Institutions and Governance Program, World Resources Institute, 10 G Street, NE, Suite 800, Washington, DC, 20009, USA and Department of Geography, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 232 Davenport MC-150, 607S, Mathews Ave., Urbana IL, 61801, USA
2 Department of Geography, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 232 Davenport MC-150, 607S, Mathews Ave., Urbana IL, 61801, USA and Sustainability Science Program, Center for International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 501, Rubenstein Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
3 Local Governance Research Unit, Department of Public Policy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester LE1 9BH, UK

Correspondence Address:
Jesse C Ribot
Institutions and Governance Program, World Resources Institute, 10 G Street, NE, Suite 800, Washington, DC, 20009, USA and Department of Geography, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 232 Davenport MC-150, 607S, Mathews Ave., Urbana IL, 61801, USA

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and Permissions

What are the democracy effects of 'decentralisation' reforms and projects? Most developing countries have launched decentralisation reforms for the purpose of improving service delivery, local development and management. In these reforms and projects, however, governments, international development agen­cies and large non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are transferring power to a wide range of local in­stitutions, including private bodies, customary authorities and NGOs. Recognition of these other local institutions means that fledgling local governments are receiving few public powers and face competition for legitimacy. Under what conditions is the new plurality of approaches and local interlocutors fostering local democratic consolidation or resulting in fragmented forms of authority and belonging? Through case studies in Benin, Guatemala, India, Malawi, Russia, Senegal and South Africa, this issue explores the effects of institutional choices and recognition by governments, international development agencies and large NGOs on three dimensions of democracy: 1) representation, 2) citizenship and 3) the public domain. This article outlines an approach to the politics of institutional choice and recognition while drawing out findings from the articles in this issue.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed4428    
    Printed286    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded1186    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal