Home       About us   Issues     Search     Submission Subscribe   Contact    Login 
Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
Users Online: 2736 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

SPECIAL ISSUES
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 478-503

Between Bolivar and Bureaucracy: The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor


Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University, 950 Main St., Worcester, MA 01610, USA

Correspondence Address:
Liza Grandia
Department of International Development, Community, and Environment, Clark University, 950 Main St., Worcester, MA 01610
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and Permissions

This article explores how the different elements of the Meso­american Biological Corridor (MBC) may not be so "naturally united" as implied by this slogan. I trace the history and evolution of this conservation corridor from its roots in the Central American environment movement to its transformation by the World Bank into a vague bureaucratic framework. The shift to embrace green neoliberalism, in turn, has served to mask threats to biodiversity from three other more powerful economic corridors being simul­taneously constructed in the Mesoamerican region, namely: (1) the Puebla to Panama Plan, (2) Mundo Maya, and (3) the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). I conclude by describing some lost opportunities for in­digenous and bottom-up environmental initiatives to suggest what a Boli­varian alternative might have been before the MBC became bureaucratised by transnational conservation interests.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7594    
    Printed242    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded1137    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal