Home       About us   Issues     Search     Submission Subscribe   Contact    Login 
Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
Users Online: 503 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

REPORT
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 499-521

Common Property among Indigenous Peoples of the Ecuadorian Amazon


1 Department of City and Regional Planning, CB #8120, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3115, USA
2 Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3115, USA

Correspondence Address:
Jason Bremner
CB #8120, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3115
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and Permissions

Policies promoting conservation of indigenous lands in the Amazon would benefit greatly from a closer examination of the local common property institutions that influence resource use. The goals of this paper are to summa­rise findings from past research related to common property institutions among indigenous and traditional peoples of the Amazon, and to examine with empirical data, the complex patterns of communal resource management exhibited in a cross-cultural study population in the Ecuadorian Amazon. We find that: (1) the diverse common property institutions functioning among in­digenous populations of the Ecuadorian Amazon can be loosely grouped into individual and communal arrangements; (2) conceptions of ownership and rights vary both inter- and intraethnically and; (3) within communities, insti­tutions and the rights they grant vary greatly between different types of re­sources. Evidence from the literature suggests that indigenous institutions are effective at securing exclusive access and withdrawal rights for community members, but that these institutions are less effective at further managing re­sources. Our results suggest, however, the existence of diverse management arrangements for a multitude of resources. The growing number of indigenous land conservation strategies demands further research on these complex so­cial institutions to ensure that strategies are both locally appropriate and ef­fective, and thus we suggest several important areas for future research.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7123    
    Printed236    
    Emailed3    
    PDF Downloaded945    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal